LARRY ROBINSON
KINGS HEAD COACH 1995-1999

All-Time Kings Coaches | Current Kings Coaches

Larry Robinson served as Kings head coach for four seasons, posting a 122-161-45 mark in 328 games from 1995-99, before being relieved of his duties on April 18, 1999.

Throughout his illustrious 20-year NHL playing career, Robinson was synonymous with winning. When the Kings hired Robinson as head coach on July 26, 1995, they invested in a person whose commitment to the game of hockey has resulted in seven Stanley Cups.

After enduring two trying seasons as a first-time NHL head coach, Robinson’s innate desire to win has gotten him through the early stages of rebuilding and learning the intricacies of coaching. The 1997-98 season was a breakthrough year for Robinson as the Kings made a 20-point improvement from the previous season (second-best in the NHL) posting a 38-33-11 record, their best mark since the 1992-93 season. The Kings second-place finish in the Pacific Division brought them their first postseason berth in five seasons, and Robinson was named runner-up for the NHL Coach of the Year honors (Jack Adams Trophy was won by Boston’s Pat Burns).

Robinson ranks third on the Kings all-time games coached list with 328 (Bob Pulford- 396, Andy Murray-480) and his 122-161-45 record and .441 winning percentage places him sixth all-time among Kings head coaches with at least 100 games to their credit.

One of the greatest defensemen in the history of the NHL, Robinson finished his career with the Kings following the 1991-92 season. Robinson spent one year away from the game before joining the New Jersey Devils as assistant coach to his former teammate Jacques Lemaire. The incredible impact of this coaching duo during his two seasons culminated in New Jersey’s 1995 Stanley Cup victory over the Detroit Red Wings.

Robinson’s future as a coach took on meteoric proportions after New Jersey skated to its best record ever in 1993-94 (47-25-12, 106 points), the second-best mark in the league that year behind the New York Rangers. His influence on the Devils’ defense was apparent as New Jersey gave up 220 goals (79 fewer than the previous season), just two more than league-leading Buffalo. Following the 1994-95 Stanley Cup winning season, Robinson was immediately at the top of everyone’s list as a head coaching-candidate and the Kings strong pursuit of his services convinced him to return to Los Angeles.

Robinson began his NHL playing career with the Montreal Canadiens during their 1972-73 Stanley Cup season and remained there for 17 years. The Habs won five more Stanley Cups with Robinson spearheading the defense; including four straight title’s from 1975-76 to 1978-79. His legendary effort during the 1978 playoffs earned him the Conn Smythe Trophy as the playoff MVP.

His individual prowess on defense brought many honors and awards including two Norris Trophies (1976-77, 1979-80) as the league’s top defenseman, three seasons each as a first team NHL All-Star (1976-77, 1978-79, 1979-80) and as the league’s top defenseman, three seasons each as a first team NHL All-Star (1976-77, 1978-79, 1979-80) and a second team NHL All-Star (1977-78, 1980-81, 1985-86), and 10 appearances in the NHL All-Star Game. He also led the NHL in plus/minus in 1976-77.

Robinson received the ultimate honor when he was inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame in November, 1995. During his 20-year NHL career, Robinson played in 1,384 games (12th all-time) and had 208 goals, 750 assists (fourth all-time defenseman), 958 points (sixth all-time defenseman) and 793 penalty minutes. In playoff action, Robinson holds the NHL record for most consecutive years in the NHL Playoffs (20), and is second all-time in career games played (227). He never missed the postseason and is tied with Gordie Howe for most years in playoffs. He has 28 goals, 116 assists and 144 points in his playoff career.

Robinson joined the Kings as a free agent on July 25, 1989 and spent three seasons with the club. He was the second highest-scoring defenseman on the Kings in 1989-90 with 39 points (7-32=39) and helped the team to the Smythe Division title in 1990-91.

REGULAR SEASON POSTSEASON
YEARS
G
W
L
T
OTL
PTS
PCT
GP
W
L
1995-96
82
24
40
18
-
66
.402
-
-
-
1996-97
82
28
43
11
-
67
.409
-
-
-
1997-98
82
38
33
11
-
87
.530
4
0
4
1998-99
82
32
45
5
-
69
.421
-
-
-
TOTALS
328
122
161
45
-
289
.441
4
0
4